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Thuy Vu Wins Award for Vietnam Revisited

“Vietnam Revisited” covered a number of aspects of current life in Vietnam, with a special focus on the long-term impact of the defoliant, Agent Orange.

 nhvat thuyvu cbs5

CBS 5 Reporter/Anchor Thuy Vu, Vince Garrido and Greg Marasso have won a First Place National Headliner Award for their documentary and series of stories, “Vietnam Revisited,” which explored the on-going health impact of Agent Orange, the toxin used by the US military to defoliate the jungles of Vietnam.

But there’s more. The stories also won “Best of Show,” an award given to the best TV entry in all categories of the contest! Founded in 1934 by the Press Club of Atlantic City, The National Headliner Awards program is one of the oldest and largest annual contests recognizing excellence in journalism.

“Vietnam Revisited” covered a number of aspects of current life in Vietnam, with a special focus on the long-term impact of the defoliant, Agent Orange. Thuy and Vince were asked to go to Vietnam by San Francisco State University’s Journalism Department – a trip underwritten by the Ford Foundation to raise awareness of Agent Orange’s legacy. Fifteen journalists from across the country were asked to participate in this program, with complete editorial freedom. Thuy was the only television reporter.

The work of the reporting project can be seen at www.vietnamreportingproject.org Thuy Vu is a three-time Emmy award winner. She joined CBS 5 in December 2005, based in the San Jose bureau. She is now the host of the station’s “Eye on the Bay.” Thuy has returned twice to her homeland of Vietnam for special reports on the country’s political and economic changes since the Vietnam War. She won Emmy and Associated Press awards for a report on the 30th anniversary of the first Operation Babylift flight rescuing orphans right before Saigon fell to the communists.

The story featured rare interviews with the pilot, the orphanage director and one of the orphans, now grown and living with his wife and children in Seattle. She started her journalism career in public radio at KQED-FM in San Francisco. She later moved on to National Public Radio (NPR), where she first covered Congress and national politics in Washington, D.C. before returning to their San Francisco bureau.

Thuy emigrated from Vietnam in 1975, fleeing the country with her family as Saigon fell to the communists. Vu is a member of the Asian American Journalists Association. She’s also on the board of directors for the Asian Pacific Fund, a community foundation that provides scholarships to students and funding grants for Asian nonprofits in the Bay Area.

March 29, 2011Posted in: Bay Area, News

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